Department/Center PIs

Web.McMahon by ChanningAndrew P. McMahon, PhD, FRS
Director, Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC; Chair, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine; W.M. Keck Provost Professor of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and Biological Sciences; Chair of the Executive Committee, USC Stem Cell
Dr. McMahon’s laboratory explores the mechanisms that maintain stem/progenitor cells and regulate their differentiation to mature cell types of different organ systems, particularly the kidney. By combining genetic and genomic approaches with high resolution imaging, his group is aiming to obtain a deeper understanding of stem cell biology and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for regenerative medicine.


Bonaguidi_scrmMichael Bonaguidi, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
Dr. Bonaguidi and his team investigate brain development, adaptation and aging through the lens of individual neural stem cells. His laboratory takes an integrative approach to establishing fundamental principles of tissue plasticity with the purpose of identifying and overcoming the limits of endogenous brain repair.


200Cannon 1008-033-¬by Don MiliciPaula Cannon, PhD
Professor, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Pediatrics, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
Dr. Cannon’s research is focused on viruses, stem cells and gene therapy. The viruses that her laboratory studies are HIV-1 and several biodefense related viruses, such as Ebola and Junin, that cause severe viral hemorrhagic fevers.


Yang Chai, DDS, PhDYang Chai crop web 2
Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine; George and MaryLou Boone Professor of Craniofacial Molecular Biology; Director, Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology; Associate Dean of Research, Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC
Dr. Chai’s laboratory is interested in early craniofacial development and malformations, including the molecular regulation of cranial neural crest cells. His laboratory has developed genetically engineered mouse models, and has made important discoveries about the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) niche in the craniofacial region and about utilizing MSCs with 3D printed scaffolds for tissue regeneration.


Web.Gage Crump preferredGage Crump, PhD
Associate Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Integrative Anatomical Sciences
Dr. Crump uses zebrafish to understand how the cartilages and bones of our faces are patterned during development. His lab is discovering the local tissue-tissue interactions that control skeletal differentiation and morphogenesis in vivo, and also exploring novel ways of regenerating bone in adults.


Denis Evseenko, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
Dr. Evseenko investigates the potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) to grow, repair and replace cartilage. By identifying and characterizing the formation of hPSC in early human development, he and his colleagues hope to overcome the significant obstacles inhibiting the ability to generate new tissue for transplantation and illuminate the way for potential new treatments, including alternatives to joint replacement.


Amy Firth cropAmy Firth, PhD
Assistant Professor, Medicine, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Firth uses induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) generated from skin biopsies to study human lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. She combines gene editing, iPSC technologies and directed differentiation: 1) to generate reproducible models of respiratory diseases in a dish; 2) to generate chimeric animal models to understand disease development and progression; and 3) to utilize these models in high-throughput screening.


Scott FraserScott E. Fraser, PhD
Provost Professor, Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine; Director, Science Initiatives

Dr. Fraser has a long-standing interest in the imaging and molecular analysis of intact biological systems, and has been developing new technologies for novel assays. His current research centers on the high-content imaging of embryonic zebrafish and analysis of craniofacial development in avians and mice.


Web.Senta Georgia - Photo by Cristy LytalSenta Georgia, PhD
Assistant Professor, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles; Pediatrics, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, USC

Dr. Georgia’s research involves the regeneration of insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells as a potential therapeutic for patients with type 1 diabetes. Some of her recent work describes how an enzyme DNMT1 is critical to stem cells differentiating into pancreatic beta cells.


Web.Justin Ichida by Cristy LytalJustin Ichida, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Ichida’s research focuses on how genetic and environmental factors contribute to human neurodegenerative disease. His laboratory uses cellular reprogramming and stem cell technology to build patient-specific in vitro models of neurodegenerative disease, enabling the screening of drug-like compounds in search of potential therapeutics.


Web.Rong Lu by Cristy Lytal 2Rong Lu, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Lu studies stem cell coordination, regulation and malfunction from a single cell perspective, using mouse hematopoietic stem cells as a model system. Research in her laboratory is focused on understanding the differences between individual stem cells and how they are coordinated in sustaining the common blood supply.


Wange LuWange Lu, PhD
Associate Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Dr. Lu’s research focuses on epigenetics and signaling control of neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, and 3D nuclear architecture in pluripotency and somatic cell reprogramming.


Francesca Mariani (Photo courtesy of Francesca Mariani)Francesca Mariani, PhD
Assistant Professor, Integrative Anatomical Sciences
Dr. Mariani’s laboratory studies the development and repair of the mammalian skeleton, with an emphasis on the ribs and handplate. They use standard and conditional knock-out techniques in mouse models and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells.


enews-mccainMegan McCain, PhD
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Dr. McCain’s group leverages techniques in tissue engineering to understand mechanisms of development and disease on the cell and tissue level. They develop and utilize tools that can probe structure-function relationships in engineered cells and tissues across multiple spatial and temporal scales.


Leonardo Morsut, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
Dr. Morsut is developing synthetic biology approaches for mammalian multicellular systems. His laboratory is engineering synthetic cell-cell communication pathways to advance tissue engineering applications as well as the fundamental understanding of multicellular dynamics.


Joe Rodgers crop 1Joseph T. Rodgers, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
Dr. Rodgers’ laboratory focuses on uncovering the signals and communication networks that instruct stem cells to coordinate and effectively work together to grow and repair organs and tissues, including muscle, skin and bone.


Neil Segil crop 3Neil Segil, PhD
Professor of Research, Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, USC Tina and Rick Caruso Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
Hearing loss and balance disorders affect more than half of adults in the US by retirement age, and loss of sensory hair cells in the inner ear is the major contributor. The long-term goal of Dr. Segil’s laboratory is the regeneration of these sensory hair cells of the inner ear.


Web.CROP Henry Sucov by Cristy Lytal PREFERREDHenry Sucov, PhD
Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Integrative Anatomical Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Dr. Sucov’s laboratory focuses on the cellular and molecular basis of cardiovascular development and the etiology of congenital cardiovascular defects, and addresses how these insights can be extended to regenerative therapies in the context of adult heart disease.


Web.Qi-Long Ying by Cristy LytalQi-Long Ying, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Integrative Anatomical Sciences

Dr. Ying’s research focuses on understanding how embryonic stem cells decide whether to self-renew or to differentiate.


Web.2.Min Yu by Cristy LytalMin Yu, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Yu researches the mechanism of cancer metastasis, the major cause of cancer-related death. Her laboratory is gaining a better understanding of the cancer stem cell properties in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and obtaining novel insights on how to target these rare populations.